Kangra Jackfruit Madra

Jackfruit Madra by Sujata Sud Pant

Ingredients of Kangra Jackfruit Madra:

  1. Jackfruit – 250 gm, fried in mustard oil
  2. Mustard Oil – 2 Tablespoon
  3. Black Cardamom – 1
  4. Cinnamon Stick – 1
  5. Green Cardamoms – 2
  6. Cloves – 4
  7. Bay leaf – 1
  8. Cumin Seeds – 1 Teaspoon
  9. Coriander Powder – 1 Teaspoon
  10. Turmeric – 1 Teaspoon
  11. 1 Green Chilly
  12. Saunth (Dried Ginger Powder) – ½ Teaspoon
  13. Yoghurt – 1 Kg, beaten into a smooth paste
  14. Jaggery – 1 Teaspoon
  15. Garam Masala Powder – ½ Teaspoon
  16. Fresh Chopped Coriander – for garnish
  17. Almonds and Cashews, chopped and fried – ½ cup (optional)
  18. Ghee – 2 Tablespoons

Method:

In a kadhai heat the mustard oil till it smokes and cool it slightly. Then add both the cardamoms, cinnamon stick, cloves, bay leaf, cumin seeds, coriander powder, turmeric, green chilly and saunth.

After the spices splutter, add 250gms beaten yoghurt carefully into this masala. Stir continuously, do not let it curdle. Once it starts boiling reduce heat and gently simmer. After 10 minutes add another 250 gm of yoghurt and repeat the process. This has to be done till all the yoghurt has been added and literary fried.

Add the fried jackfruit (or whatever vegetable) you have decided on, mix well and cook for 5 to 10 minutes.

Add 1teaspoon of jaggery to balance the sourness of yoghurt, also the garam masala, fresh chopped coriander, almonds and cashews, if you want.

Lastly add 2 tablespoons of ghee, mix it all and serve.

Tip: You can also use: boiled kabuli chana, or matar-paneer combination or fried cauliflower or fried potatoes. The most exotic madra is made with guchhis [wild mushrooms] or lungru ka madra. Lungru is called fiddlehead fern and grows wild in the Himalayas during the rainy season.

Krishna Sahai
Krishna Sahai

Krishna Sahai took voluntary retirement as a senior Commissioner of Income Tax of the Indian Revenue Service to follow alternative paths. A multi-talented person, she is a trained Bharata Natyam dancer and has also published a book on the subject. Krishna has imbibed the old traditions of Avadhi culture from her family and is concerned about preserving the vanishing cuisines of India. She consults on financial and business matters apart from running a not-for-profit organization.

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